It felt like we were choosing the children

themselves, as though the quality of

illustrations and story would certainly

affect their burgeoning development.

Choose Green Eggs instead of Cloudy

Meatballs, and our children might speak

in contrived sing-song rhymes, instead of

complete, coherent sentences.  On the

other hand, should we decide on Cloudy;

might they stand outside with a bowl

every time it rained? Should we

contemplate whether or not, temperature

aside, Goldie Locks filched porridge made

with milk? Should we consider the

presentation of swine using tools to build

their houses in Pigs?  We discussed, at

length, the anthropomorphic

representation of carpenter pigs and how

this plays into the paradox of bacon strips:

how they are glorified in a web of stories

then served for breakfast.  The

conversation moved deeper –

Say every time we read Wild Things

aloud, would we also feel the need to

add our own commentary – “you know

we are all animals?” What if they get

to kindergarten and they don’t know

that the big “bad” wolf ate grandma?

Will other children laugh at them?

Ashley and I, too, were outcasts as

children; this is comforting.

2013 Poetry Winner ORDERING CHILDREN’S BOOKS FOR UNBORN CHILDREN by Matthew Guzman